Taking a Twitter Dip in New England’s New Enrollment Pools

Our Twitter content allows us to bring readers a larger resource base—a larger canvas, in a sense—than NEJHE articles alone. We urge you to see us as parts of a whole.

Every NEJHE item automatically posts to Twitter, but we also use Twitter to disseminate interesting news or opinion pieces from elsewhere, and these tweets are often juxtaposed with something NEBHE has worked on in the past and sometimes presented with an added comment.

In the past couple months, many of our tweets and NEJHE articles have touched on the enrollment pressures bearing down on higher education institutions and the often-underrepresented groups that could buoy them. These groups include traditionally underserved Black, Hispanic and Native American students, but also Muslims, LGBTQ students, students with disabilities or social and emotional challenges, rurally isolated students, those affected by incarceration and the many caught in America’s harsh immigration system.

In May, we took to Twitter to re-post a piece from INSIGHT Into Diversity reminding educators to be mindful of students fasting during Ramadan.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Among other recent tweets you may have missed that also tease out the enrollment-financial sustainability conundrum, consider …

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Meanwhile, the scourge of mental and emotional problems on New England campuses only intensifies as an opiate haze hits surrounding New England communities especially hard. Good news is that mental health stigma is being addressed and students are being helped by initiatives like CONNECT@UMB at UMass Boston.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The debate over immigration is also coloring our national and regional education and economic future. Note, for example, these key pieces we’ve re-tweeted from the Maine Center for Public Interest Reporting’s Pine Tree Watch and the Boston Globe, as well as frequent NEJHE coverage of DACA and immigration.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And don’t forget incarcerated students; the U.S. jails more people than any other country in the world.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The challenges facing New England higher education and the regional economy are complex, marked in some cases by stale business models and, crucially, declining cohorts of traditional college-age students. One thing’s for certain: We need to make sure groups of people who may not have fully participated in the past are now afforded access to quality education and support to succeed.

John O. Harney is executive editor of The New England Journal of Higher Education.

 

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Data Connection: Languages, Moods and Preferences

From time to time, we revive the presentation of facts and figures called “Data Connection” that we had published quarterly for nearly 20 years in the print editions of The New England Journal of Higher Education (formerly Connection).

Change in U.S. college enrollments in languages other than English from fall 2013 to fall 2016: -9.2% Modern Language Association

Number of foreign-language programs that colleges closed during that period: 651 Modern Language Association

Rank of American Sign Language among most popular “foreign-language” majors for bachelor’s-degree recipients: 7th Chronicle of Higher Education analysis of U.S. Department of Education data

Percentage of Americans who are satisfied with the moral and ethical climate in 2019: 26% Gallup

Percentage who said they were satisfied in 2001: 36% Gallup

Percentage of Americans under age 30 who said during the first two years of the Trump administration they would like to move to another country permanently: 30% Gallup

Number of New England cities among the 50 most ethnically diverse cities in the U.S. in terms of ethnicity and race, language and birthplace: 13 Wallethub

U.S. ranks of Massachusetts and Connecticut among states whose residents and businesses contribute more in federal taxes than the states receive back in federal spending: 3rd, 4th Nelson A. Rockefeller Institute of Government of SUNY

Overall admission rate among applicants to Harvard University: 5% The Harvard Crimson

Harvard’s admission rate from 2010 to 2015 for “legacy” students with at least one Harvard-educated parent: 34% Jennifer Lee of Columbia University in Los Angeles Times

Change in newsroom employment in the U.S. between 2008 and 2017: -23% U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Number of children who died as a result of workplace injuries between 2003 and 2016: 452 Government Accountability Office

For earlier installments of “Data Connection,” see:

John O. Harney is executive editor of The New England Journal of Higher Education.

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Data Connection: Immigration, Politics, Jobs, Absenteeism and Fishing

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From time to time, we revive the collection of facts and figures called “Data Connection” that we had published quarterly for nearly 20 years in the print editions of The New England Journal of Higher Education (formerly Connection).

The latest …

Estimated percentage of children in Cambridge, Mass., who have at least one foreign-born parent: 40% Cambridge Community Foundation

Number of state lawmakers who have faced public allegations or repercussions over sexual misconduct claims since start of 2017: 75+ Associated Press

Number who ran and won re-election in 2018: 17+ Governing

Women as a share of the Massachusetts Legislature: 29% State House News Service

Rank of “financial administration” jobs among fastest-growing in local governments between 2014 and 2017: 1st U.S. Census Bureau Annual Survey of Public Employment and Payroll (figures show employees working in finance-related roles increased 5.4%)

U.S. rank of New Hampshire among states with the largest growth in such jobs: 1st U.S. Census Bureau Annual Survey of Public Employment and Payroll (figures show full-time-equivalent local government financial administration employees  increased at 15.3%)

Share of U.S. teachers who are black: 7% Johns Hopkins University and American University

Share of U.S. K-12 students who are black: 15% Johns Hopkins University and American University

Increased likelihood that a student of color who had one black teacher by third grade would enroll in college: 13% Johns Hopkins University and American University

Estimated cost of security provided by U.S. Marshals Service to U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos in fiscal 2018: $6.8 million NBC News

Percentage of U.S. public school students who missed 15 or more days during the 2015-16 school year (the most recent data available): 15% Governing analysis of U.S. Department of Education Civil Rights data

Percentage in Vermont: 11% Governing analysis of U.S. Department of Education Civil Rights data

Percentage in Rhode Island: 21% Governing analysis of U.S. Department of Education Civil Rights data

Number of consecutive years that the port of New Bedford, Mass. has ranked No. 1 nationally in the value of its commercial fisheries catch: 18 NOAA Fisheries

John O. Harney is executive editor of The New England Journal of Higher Education.

This piece was cross-posted at http://www.nebhe.org.

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More Data Connection: Citizens

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From time to time, we revive the collection of facts and figures called “Data Connection” that we had published quarterly for nearly 20 years in the print editions of The New England Journal of Higher Education (formerly Connection).

The latest …

Percentage of 18-24-year-olds who attended a political demonstration or march in 2016: 5% Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning & Engagement (CIRCLE) at Tufts University’s Jonathan M. Tisch College of Civic Life

Percentage who did so in 2018: 15% Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning & Engagement (CIRCLE) at Tufts University’s Jonathan M. Tisch College of Civic Life

Percentage of Americans who can pass a multiple choice test consisting of items taken from the U.S. Citizenship Test: 36% Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation

Percentage who didn’t know how many justices serve on the U.S. Supreme Court: 57% Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation

Number of women who had won the Nobel Prize in physics before Donna Strickland shared the 2018 prize for creating technology that generates high-intensity, ultra-short laser pulses, which are used for eye surgeries and material sciences: 2 Todd Adams, Florida State University, The Conversation

Preliminary average starting salary for Class of 2018 graduates: is $50,004 National Association of Colleges and Employers Fall 2018 Salary Survey

Preliminary average starting salary for computer and information sciences graduates in the Class of 2018: $73,768 National Association of Colleges and Employers Fall 2018 Salary Survey

Percentage of college graduates who say an undergraduate mentor provided advice on academic issues: 92% 2018 Strada-Gallup Alumni Survey

Percentage of college graduates who say an undergraduate mentor provided advice on the student’s career: 90% 2018 Strada-Gallup Alumni Survey

Percentage who say an undergraduate mentor provided advice on the student’s physical or mental health: 53% 2018 Strada-Gallup Alumni Survey

Percentage of college students who struggle with a mental illness: 35% American Psychological Association

John O. Harney is executive editor of The New England Journal of Higher Education.

Painting of Kuniyoshi From Out of the Sky by Montserrat College professor Timothy Harney.

This piece was cross-posted at http://www.nebhe.org.

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Numbers Game … More Data Connection

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From time to time, we revive the collection of facts and figures called “Data Connection” that we had published quarterly for nearly 20 years in the print editions of The New England Journal of Higher Education (formerly Connection).

The latest …

Inflation-adjusted increase in household incomes for the bottom quarter of Maine workers between 2016 and 2017 after the state’s voter-approved minimum wage increase: 10% Maine Center for Economic Policy

Reduction in number of Maine children living in poverty between 2016 and 2017 after the minimum wage increase: 10,000 Maine Center for Economic Policy

Percentage of respondents to the UNH Carsey School of Public Policy’s Upper Valley Child Care Survey who reported that child care is necessary in order for them to work: 96% Carsey School of Public Policy (The Upper Valley includes Orange and Windsor Counties in Vermont and Grafton and Sullivan Counties in New Hampshire.)

Number of children under age 5 in the Upper Valley Census who live in fully employed families (two working parents if they live with two and one working parent if they live with one): 7,300 Carsey School of Public Policy

Number of licensed slots available for children in this age group: 4,995 Carsey School of Public Policy

Number of reported hate crimes per 100,000 people in 2016 in Massachusetts: 5.9 WBUR (Data reported to the FBI from agencies—reportedly the highest rate of any state, but also drawn from more agencies than some states, including 70 communities, several colleges and the MBTA.)

U.S. ranks of Massachusetts, Vermont and Connecticut among “healthiest” U.S. states, according to United Health Foundation: 1,3,5 America’s Health Rankings, United Health Foundation

U.S. rank of South Burlington. Vt., among WalletHub’s 2018’s Best & Worst Cities for People with Disabilities, based on 31 indicators of disability-friendliness, ranging from wheelchair-accessible facilities per capita to rate of workers with disabilities to quality of public hospital system: 2 WalletHub

U.S. rank of New Haven, Conn.: 182 WalletHub

John O. Harney is executive editor of The New England Journal of Higher Education.

Painting of “Grillo Makes the Big Top by Montserrat College professor Timothy Harney.

 

This piece was cross-posted at http://www.nebhe.org.

 

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Electing a Reflection of America

(Cross-published on nebhe.org by John O. Harney.)

With votes still being counted and recounted and candidates already pondering their next campaigns, the 2018 midterm elections have left an indelible mark on New England and its representation in Washington, D.C.

New Hampshire voters elected at least 42 state representatives under age 40 to the state’s 400-member House of Representatives—the third largest legislative body in the English-speaking world. They include Cassie Levesque. In 2017, as a senior at Dover High School, she began her push to raise the marriage age—then 13 for girls and 14 for boys—as part of a Girl Scouts project. Safiya Wazir, a former Afghani refugee, won a House seat representing part of Concord. A former Nigerian refugee was re-elected to represented part of Manchester. Former state Rep. Melanie Levesque became New Hampshire’s first black state senator.

In an election that saw record numbers of women and people of color win seats, Massachusetts and Connecticut elected their first black women to Congress—former Boston City Councilor Ayanna Pressley in Massachusetts and former National Teacher of the Year Jahana Hayes in Connecticut.

New England also has new power in Washington, D.C., with the Democratic takeover of the U.S. House. U.S. Rep. Richard Neal of Springfield, Mass. is poised to chair the powerful House Ways and Means Committee, where he is likely to push East-West rail between Boston and Springfield. Another fan of the route is U.S. Rep. Jim McGovern of Worcester, Mass., who is likely to chair the House Rules Committee. Rep. Katherine Clark of Melrose, Mass., and Rep. David Cicilline of Providence, R.I. are likely to be part of the House Democratic Leadership team should Rep. Nancy Pelosi be chosen as speaker.

Maine introduced the nation’s first “ranked-choice” voting system, which lets voters rank candidates from first to last on the ballot. It provides for eliminations of last-place candidates and reallocations of votes to ensure a majority winner. On Election Day, Nov. 6, incumbent U.S. Rep. Bruce Poliquin, a Republican, beat Democratic challenger Jared Golden. But Poliquin received only 46.2% of the vote—important because Maine’s ranked-choice voting law means a candidate must be the first choice of at least 50% of voters to win automatically. Otherwise, the votes of the candidate with the least support are reallocated to whoever those voters picked as their second choice. Nine days after Election Day, Nov. 15, the victory was called for Golden. And New England’s House delegation seemed to lose its last Republican member. But on Monday, Nov. 26, Poliquin called for a hand recount of ballots.

Nationally, a record 272 women ran as general election nominees for U.S. Congress or governor this year, at least 124 elected. An also record 219 people of color ran, with at least 115 elected. Nine STEM-related professionals are entering the U.S. Congress next year, including engineers, health professionals and a computer programmer.

New England—and the nation—have long suffered from an underrepresentation of women and people of color in higher elected offices. In the 2018 midterms, that began to change.

Editor’s Note: We are pleased to work with three 2018 NEBHE policy interns whose youthful smarts have energized NEBHE, as their generation is enriching American political life (The Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning and Engagement at Tufts University estimated 31% turnout among 18- to 29-year-olds voting in the recent midterm elections—the highest youth vote in the past quarter century). The NEBHE interns—Katheryne Martinez, Haya Bacharouch and Stephanie Suarez—are all graduate students at Harvard University. Watch NEJHE for their personal thoughts on the midterm elections and New England’s edu-political future.

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Saudis Are Capable

For several fearful years, I’ve received a Daily Digest from International SOS and Control Risks warning of dangers to world travelers. The threats range from ebola to anti-immigrant unrest to a “persistent threat of militancy.” The wording is usually negative: defer non-essential travel … avoid planned protest … anticipate disruption. Increasingly, the land of the free also gets a mention. But one country’s warnings are framed in an odd positive voice … “Saudi Arabia: Jizan province: Missile interception highlights security force capabilities” … “Saudi Arabia: Missile interceptions underline security force capabilities (Revised)” … “Saudi Arabia: Al-Madinah province: Missile interception over Yanbu underlines security force capabilities (Revised)” … The reasons behind these prevalent missile attacks are surely are as newsworthy as their interception.

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